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So Cute Cookies
May 22nd, 2011, 05:15 PM
I attended a cookie demo at a local cake shop recently. They sell supplies, and do large orders of cookies that people can order as well. I was amazed when she used a 1 inch pastry brush dipped into thinned royal icing to flood her cookies. She just dipped the brush in the thinned icing, and literally painted it on the cookies. She said most people outline and flood but they do way too many cookies to take that much time at their shop. It literally took her seconds to flood the cookies. They were so smooth and clean. Of course I bought a couple brushes (made by Fat Daddy, about 3.00 each) and could not wait to try it at home. Sure enough it worked great for flooding large amounts of cookies. Just wondering if anyone else has tried this and what they think. It was also easy to wash the brush out and switch colors, I did 60 bingo ball cookies for my mother in law last week, it went so fast...

tdodd00
May 22nd, 2011, 06:07 PM
I am a little confused...did you not outline the cookie.

I can't seem to locate the brush you mentioned online, but I am curious. I suppose that Wiltons may make a pastry brush, right?

So Cute Cookies
May 22nd, 2011, 06:48 PM
I just looked at the brush... it has a website on it .... www.fatdaddios.com 1 inch pastry brush... She flooded all the cookies with it with thinned RI and then went back to pipe details with a bag and/or bottles. etc... I always use the modified version (less shortening) of Karens Mer. Powd. BC icing instead of RI and it worked great with that too. It really was a time saver for flooding lots of cookies. I could have really used that tip when I was doing 80 wedding cake cookies a couple months ago! No need to outline before flooding.. The brush is pretty flexible and got right to the edges without spilling over..They do thousands of cookie favors at their store so I figured I would try it too. It worked great.

Sweet Creations by Debbie
May 22nd, 2011, 08:01 PM
That's very interesting. It would be great if you could maybe do a photo or video tutorial so we can see exactly how you use it because that sounds like a great time-saver.

mpetty
May 22nd, 2011, 09:35 PM
Kris, I'm curious about any brush marks - did you have to scoop up a "serious" amount of icing with the brush in order to coat the cookie? Also, does your brush have natural bristles, or nylon? I was checking Global Sugar Arts and they sell a Fat Daddio with nylon bristles for $1.99, but an Ateco one with boar bristles for $4.00, so I'm wondering what kind of bristles would be best.

It sounds like this would be a really good technique to master for large orders. Thanks for the tip!

Anita1956
May 22nd, 2011, 11:17 PM
Another question. Would you be able to get enough thinness doing that method so that white icing would cover a chocolate cookie? I find even with the usual methods I have to be careful to have a thicker coating with white on chocolate than I would with other colors or with vanilla cookies.

So Cute Cookies
May 23rd, 2011, 07:03 AM
I would love to do a video to show you but I don't have a video camera and I don't have a blog.. I just bake lots of cookies as a hobby for friends and family and my husbands co-workers.. It covers very smooth, its not so thin that its see thru or anything... Its just a flood consistency, I will try it on chocolate cookies next time I bake LiaLoas great recipe. I myself don't like chocolate but that one tastes good for sure... The brush has nylon bristles and you do not need to scoop up excessive amounts of iciing....They look the same as if flooded with a bottle or bag but it goes on faster.

mpetty
May 23rd, 2011, 01:25 PM
Cool, thanks KrisCraft! This will definitely go in my "to try" file.

CindyW
May 23rd, 2011, 02:19 PM
Kris,
I've posted this link before. It's the first video I saw on cookie decorating and how I started. I've since learned to use the bottles, but I still go back to the brush if I
have either a lot of flooding of the same color to do instead of having to keep refilling the bottle. I also use the brush if I have just a little color to use and don't want to
fill a bottle.
I know the brush is smaller than the 1", but I don't have any issues with brush strokes or cookie showing thru. I still use the same consistency I use in the bottles.
You're not actually 'painting' like you would on canvas. You're sort of globbing it on and pushing it around, not spreading it like you would on paper or canvas.
I'm anxious to try a 1" brush though.
Thanks for the tip!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ZZYAxIN58w

So Cute Cookies
May 23rd, 2011, 03:23 PM
Cindy thank you so much for that post and youtube link!.... It is the same technique but the 1 inch brush picks up more and covers more of the cookie at once. You are right that you are not really painting the cookie, it is more like globbing it on and pushing it around. I would say for the price of a 3.00 pastry brush (1 inch nylon bristle) it would be worth trying for anyone curious. I love it for flooding. Its a real time saver. I prefer to flood all my cookies and go back and pipe on details with a bag or bottle either wet on wet )like polka dots or wet on dry for more dimensional look. It works great for me and obviously for this cake store that demonstrated it that decorates thousands of cookie favors.

tdodd00
May 23rd, 2011, 04:09 PM
Thanks so much for the link and the YouTube video...I remember watching that a long time ago but never ended up trying it. It sounds as though she just uses a regular paint brush, my only fear is that those bristles may come out...yikes. Probably not if you bought a really good quality brush, I suppose. This is a great idea, I may have to give it a try. Thanks for sharing all the details!

So Cute Cookies
May 23rd, 2011, 04:16 PM
Terri: The brush I bought at the cake store that they use too is by Fat Daddio www.fatdaddios.com It's a 1 inch nylon bristle pasty brush. It only cost $3.00. Definitely worth a try at that cost.

Donna Bailey
May 23rd, 2011, 05:38 PM
Thanks so much for the link and the YouTube video...I remember watching that a long time ago but never ended up trying it. It sounds as though she just uses a regular paint brush, my only fear is that those bristles may come out...yikes. Probably not if you bought a really good quality brush, I suppose. This is a great idea, I may have to give it a try. Thanks for sharing all the details!

Terri, the brush she is using in the video is a set of synthetic brushes by Lowell-Cornell that is sold in Wal-mart, Michaels, etc. and they have colorful acrylic handles and are CHEAP! So look for the pink-handle, black/brown bristle and that is probably nylon. I would imagine that different size brushes are good for different shapes....the 1" one at FatDaddios I would think is great for all-over coverage of a simple shaped cookie. But I see the round brush she uses in the video appeals to me for more intrically shaped cookies.... I guess like anything, you have to practice with it to make it work. I'm still trying to get my outline piping to go where I want it to instead of having a mind of it's own! Hee, hee.........

tdodd00
May 23rd, 2011, 07:07 PM
Thanks, Donna...I have to make a trip to HL today, so I will check out what they have!

Benevolent Baker
May 25th, 2011, 04:00 AM
Hi everyone,
I learned how to apply RI with brushes from a website that used to be called Let's Bake Cookies (she changed the name to Creative Baking Fun) and now only use them. I use artist brushes from the craft store (#6, #8 and #10) and they never lose their bristles. I prefer them to outlining because I don't like the thick edge around the cookies outlining makes. Using a brush allows you to go right to the edge and you don't have to mess with all the piping bags. If I have to detail, I used those accordian squeeze bottles you can find at Sur La Table.

DippinPops
May 25th, 2011, 05:54 AM
My brushes always lose bristles & it is a PIA to get them off w/o ruining the cookie...any suggestions on what brand to use? Also, does this work just for glaze? Would RI dry out in a bowl, or do you constantly stir it? Thanks - this looks like a great idea if I can get it to work for me : )

So Cute Cookies
May 25th, 2011, 06:23 AM
@ Dippin Pops: I use a modified version of Karens Meringue Powder Buttercream (less shortening) instead of royal icing. The brush I use is the same one the cake store uses is made by Fat Daddios, 1 inch nylon bristle.. Never had a bristle come out.. It cost 3.00.

DippinPops
May 25th, 2011, 05:37 PM
@ Dippin Pops: I use a modified version of Karens Meringue Powder Buttercream (less shortening) instead of royal icing. The brush I use is the same one the cake store uses is made by Fat Daddios, 1 inch nylon bristle.. Never had a bristle come out.. It cost 3.00.

Thanks - will keep my eyes open for them... ;)

Anita1956
May 25th, 2011, 08:28 PM
Okay, I tried it and while I don't know if I'd use the brush technique on a regular basis I can tell already that it's going to save my life with the 200 three-tier wedding cake cookies I have to get in the mail next Friday! Thank you KRIS!!!!

And by the way...my favorite part? NO air bubbles in the icing!

Linda
May 25th, 2011, 09:32 PM
I've been basecoating the past several hours. Started out piping in then using toothpick to spread to edge. Then used brush (don't know size, but not big enough!) after piping border. Worked OK, bigger brush needed. Then dolloped with baby spoon into center and spread with brush. Finally now am dolloping and spreading to outline with back of spoon. That seems to be working the best, and quickest! Also, not as many bubbles.

Ran out of red glaze, so now have more sitting. Three dozen more circles, then on to 4+ dozen grad hats (I always do some extra). I have black glaze mixed, waiting to see if it darkens enough. I am worried about black mouths!! I can switch to white hats if the black is problematic. Does Americolor stain mouths less than Wilton?

DippinPops
May 25th, 2011, 10:36 PM
Okay, I tried it and while I don't know if I'd use the brush technique on a regular basis I can tell already that it's going to save my life with the 200 three-tier wedding cake cookies I have to get in the mail next Friday! Thank you KRIS!!!!

And by the way...my favorite part? NO air bubbles in the icing!

Anita, the tiered wedding cake cookies are on my TTD list - in fact the cookies are baked & in the freezer already. Do you plan on stacking while they are wet, or attaching them with icing after each cookie is dry? Just curious before I start & find out there was a better way ; )

DippinPops
May 25th, 2011, 10:38 PM
Linda, some say there is less black-mouth with Americolor, but personally, I think they are about the same. Maybe if you use other colors to get it dark, then a little black to finish it up will work?

Anita1956
May 25th, 2011, 10:39 PM
I've been basecoating the past several hours. Started out piping in then using toothpick to spread to edge. Then used brush (don't know size, but not big enough!) after piping border. Worked OK, bigger brush needed. Then dolloped with baby spoon into center and spread with brush. Finally now am dolloping and spreading to outline with back of spoon. That seems to be working the best, and quickest! Also, not as many bubbles.

Ran out of red glaze, so now have more sitting. Three dozen more circles, then on to 4+ dozen grad hats (I always do some extra). I have black glaze mixed, waiting to see if it darkens enough. I am worried about black mouths!! I can switch to white hats if the black is problematic. Does Americolor stain mouths less than Wilton?

I don't know how to compare it to Wilton since I've only used Americolor but black and red both stain mouths noticeably. A bride recently asked me to make red hearts with black writing for her upcoming wedding....at least the cookies are favors so their stained mouths will be happening at home rather than at the reception.

kotoula
May 26th, 2011, 05:36 AM
Hi Anita,

I saw some of your flickr photos and your cookies look great!

I noticed you use tubes for icing and thats what I like too. How do you pour yours in the tube easily and also can you freeze the bottle as it is in freezer?

Thanks
Angela

Anita1956
May 26th, 2011, 05:49 AM
Angela,

Thank you :) By tubes you mean squeeze bottles? If so, then yes :) I mix the icing by color in disposable deli containers and because they're made from a thin plastic, I can easily form a pouring spout by squeeing the sides together. And yes, I freeze the icing in the squeeze bottles but I replace the coupler with the screw on top AND I make sure to not fill the icing to the top otherwise the icing can expand when freezing and puff out the sides of the bottle. No biggie but I figure it will wear out the bottles quicker. I also use a chopstick to stir the icing in the bottle before using (an idea I got from someone else here...like just about every idea, tip, or trick I've learned about cookies :)

lov2bake
March 9th, 2012, 03:56 PM
When using the 1" brush, do you hold the cookie in your hand or paint them laying flat on the tray? I once saw a big cookie company on TV. They were wearing plastic gloves and picked up each cookie and painted the base on in seconds. Any thoughts of holding vs laying flat?

So Cute Cookies
March 9th, 2012, 04:16 PM
When using the 1" brush, do you hold the cookie in your hand or paint them laying flat on the tray? I once saw a big cookie company on TV. They were wearing plastic gloves and picked up each cookie and painted the base on in seconds. Any thoughts of holding vs laying flat?
Hi! I had to reread this post and refresh my memory.. I think the class demonstrated picking up the cookie, and getting a glob of flood icing on the brush and basically pushing it around to the edges. By picking it up I think you got more control to get it to the edges easier. It went fast and dried smooth with good coverage. I actually found some 6 inch bottles with couples at Sur La Table since then and find those very easy to flood cookies and primarily use that method. But it did work well when I had to do a large order of wedding cake cookies that all had to be flooded ivory, it saved my hand from so much squeezing and refilling the bottles.

daj22602
March 11th, 2012, 12:58 AM
I attended a cookie demo at a local cake shop recently. They sell supplies, and do large orders of cookies that people can order as well. I was amazed when she used a 1 inch pastry brush dipped into thinned royal icing to flood her cookies. She just dipped the brush in the thinned icing, and literally painted it on the cookies. She said most people outline and flood but they do way too many cookies to take that much time at their shop. It literally took her seconds to flood the cookies. They were so smooth and clean. Of course I bought a couple brushes (made by Fat Daddy, about 3.00 each) and could not wait to try it at home. Sure enough it worked great for flooding large amounts of cookies. Just wondering if anyone else has tried this and what they think. It was also easy to wash the brush out and switch colors, I did 60 bingo ball cookies for my mother in law last week, it went so fast...

Okay, the brushes are by Fat Daddy. Does she have a website? Does Karen carry them? Should I go to Amazon?

So Cute Cookies
March 11th, 2012, 01:10 AM
Okay, the brushes are by Fat Daddy. Does she have a website? Does Karen carry them? Should I go to Amazon?

http://www.globalsugarart.com/product.php?id=25487&name=Nylon%20Pastry%20Brush%201%20inch%20wide%20by %20Fat%20Daddio%27s
Here is a link to the brush, you could probably do an internet search on ebay or amazon too.
I will say I used this technique only when flooding a large amount of 1 color large cookies (wedding cakes) but for most of my flooding I use 6 oz bottles with coupler and a #2 or #3 tip, the bottles I buy at Sur La Table.

SugarFairy
March 11th, 2012, 01:15 AM
Here's the link to the brushes...they look almost like the kind of brushes you would find in a hardware store...http://www.fatdaddios.com/catalog/pastry-brushes-5-1