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Anita1956
June 3rd, 2011, 08:34 AM
Okay, here's the recurring problem. Whenever I make a thick line or drop of icing I'll come back to find when it's dried that there's either a smooth indentation or in this case, a broken crater. I check for bubbles, tap the cookies, and wave a magic wand over them but no matter, this happens more often than not and I've tried touching it up but that never looks any better.

This doesn't happen when I do regular flooding. Just when I do a thick detail line or dollop. Any clues and suggestions? Anyone? Don't be shy. Step up to the mic and share your wisdom.

8214

Justforfuncookies
June 3rd, 2011, 10:59 AM
Sweetopia has a couple of posts on this.

http://sweetopia.net/category/decorated-cookies/

I've read through these a couple of times and I'm not sure there is really a definitive answer. I notice that it often happens in small spaces. This is another of the great cookie mysteries.

bonniebakes
June 3rd, 2011, 12:02 PM
I think it happens more often in small spaces, too. And I find it happens more often if I use a smaller tip. I think it has to do with air (or lighter weight still-wet icing) being trapped underneath the dried outside layer and causing a "pocket" that caves in when it is drying.

mpetty
June 3rd, 2011, 12:38 PM
[blink, blink], I'm sorry what were you saying?...I was too busy looking at that beautiful cookie...

Anita1956
June 3rd, 2011, 02:33 PM
Oh bother. I was rather hoping for a three step solution. Never experienced the dreaded blotchiness but these craters are my personal curse. Julie, thanks for Sweetopia's post. I know it has to be trapped air being released but the frustration is there aren't any evident air bubbles to pop until it's too late and yet I can almost predict where it's going to happen. Think I might try stirring those areas with a sewing needle befire they harden just to see if that will make a difference.

Anita1956
June 3rd, 2011, 02:34 PM
[blink, blink], I'm sorry what were you saying?...I was too busy looking at that beautiful cookie...

Well then, you'd be pleased as punch by the entire platter of crater festooned flower cookies :)

Donna Bailey
June 3rd, 2011, 03:03 PM
Gorgeous cookie....who's gonna notice except the artist? Seriously, do you think you might hand-stir your thick detailing icing to keep from beating in the air with a mixer? Or maybe try the piece of nylon stocking "filter" not to keep the tip from clogging, but to maybe break up any air in the icing as it comes from the bag/bottle? Yes, to me this is another elusive mystery of cookie-decorating.....

focadima
June 3rd, 2011, 03:16 PM
ditto ditto ditto

such a beautiful cookie!!

Sweet Creations by Debbie
June 3rd, 2011, 03:55 PM
I've found that I have this issue more when I have thinner icing. I usually thin it down a bit more when I'm going to write with a tiny tip so that it flows better, but I find that it happens more when I thin it a bit. Maybe try thickening your icing a bit?

hrmacphe
June 3rd, 2011, 04:11 PM
Anita, I don't have any additional advice, but I feel your pain. I have issues with craters too and it's so frustrating.

Liat
June 3rd, 2011, 04:40 PM
I used to have it alllll the time, used to drive me nuts.......
but I found 2 solutions :
1. Put the cookies in front of the fan right after you do these little areas.
2. Yesterday I tried for the first time RI from the ready mix. Loved it, it is shiny, no craters, and very smooth and manageable. I may start using it exclusively.

mpetty
June 3rd, 2011, 04:51 PM
Well then, you'd be pleased as punch by the entire platter of crater festooned flower cookies :)

:lol: I know, I know, it's frustrating as all heck, but your artistry is too powerful to be stopped by those #$%! craters!

HeoKhi Cookies
June 3rd, 2011, 10:50 PM
I had that same problem making small hearts, dots & lines! So frustrating! But the problem went away. All I did was thicken my icing, massaged the bag to release any air bubbles, let the icing sit a few minutes and I have not had that trouble since. (I only use glaze icing though.)

TheCuteCookie
June 5th, 2011, 07:46 PM
I know it has to be trapped air being released but the frustration is there aren't any evident air bubbles to pop until it's too late and yet I can almost predict where it's going to happen. Think I might try stirring those areas with a sewing needle befire they harden just to see if that will make a difference.


This happens to me at times too -- it is those super-sneaky-invisible-to-the-human-eye-so-we-can-drive-you-absolutely-batty type bubbles. And honestly, I do the quick stir with a toothpick in anticipating that there are hiding bubbles somewhere in that icing. Anytime I DON'T do the quick stir (thinking nah, it's not gonna happen this time), the craters come. It is most likely to happen with thinner icing as well, but I just give it a little stir and it works almost everytime.

SugarandStitches
December 13th, 2011, 11:37 PM
I have this same problem! I asked Pam from cookie crazie about it and she said that she uses a heat gun on her small spaces right after she pipes them and it prevents the craters. I have not tried it yet but it I just thought I would toss the info out there.

LilaLoa
December 14th, 2011, 06:40 AM
Oh bother. I was rather hoping for a three step solution. Never experienced the dreaded blotchiness but these craters are my personal curse. Julie, thanks for Sweetopia's post. I know it has to be trapped air being released but the frustration is there aren't any evident air bubbles to pop until it's too late and yet I can almost predict where it's going to happen. Think I might try stirring those areas with a sewing needle befire they harden just to see if that will make a difference.


Anita -- I have tried this. And tried this. And...sometimes it helps, but not always. Just last week I tried it on a cookie and I stood right next to that thing with a pin until the second it dried and caved in. So I moved on to my other theory.

Thicker icing. Every time I've made my icing thicker the dents and craters go away. Its kind of a pain though because you have to get the exact perfect consistency -- It has to be thick enough to dry solid faster than the surface tension can collapse in on itself BUT not so dry that it doesn't smooth over before drying. Don't you have a heat gun? Does it help at all with this little mess of a mystery?

Jeri
December 14th, 2011, 07:37 AM
So happy to say that holes and craters are not a problem I've encountered since I started just useing the mixer until all ingredients are incorporated, then use a spatula and continue to 'fold' the icing to the proper consistancy so that it doesn't have so much air in it to begin with and give it another gentle stir just before it's put into the piping bag.

sashasmommy
March 16th, 2012, 02:20 AM
I am by no means an expert, in fact I just started decorating, but this last time I made cookies, I made the icing on Friday, the cookies on Saturday, and decorated on Sunday. This was the first time that I had only a couple bubbles, and only ONE crater in about 35 cookies. And my crater happened on a spot where the frosting was coming out weird, I think the tip was clogged or something. I'm not sure if it was because the icing sat for so long or what. There were plenty of bubbles in the icing when it was in the bag, but never had an issue.

sashasmommy
September 8th, 2012, 04:02 PM
Interestingly, I get more craters when I mix my icing with a beater blade with silicone scraper... I went back to using the whisk attachment and the craters decreased significantly, but I do still get them. Last time I tried using a small paintbrush to fill in the holes... it's kind of lame, but ended up looking better than having a hole there.

adagaladriel
November 25th, 2012, 10:28 AM
Having the same problem too with the glaze. I am so annoyed this morning, I went to bed at 3am, decorating, and this morning... Oh noo!! Craters!! I have read and read, and as it seems we cannot find the reason of why craters happen, I am focusing on the solutions. I have read that using a heat gun, also using cold air, also using a food dehydrator. I am a bit confused, what is best? hot or cold air, after doing the decorations to help it dry faster? I was thing hot air could kind of dissolve the icing?
And next, now I have the craters, the way of concealing them?? sashamommy says using a small paintbrush, do you need to thin the icing for this too?
Another problem I had, some colors have spotty marks, mostly the darker ones, like black and brown. It seems like it was too cold in the night (we don't leave the heating on at night), and it seems like they were freezing. I suppose if I use some of the methods above to speed the drying, this won't happen. But now Have them, how to improve the look? Maybe with the small paintbrush and very thin icing too?
Please help...

makauflin
November 25th, 2012, 05:42 PM
Ugh, craters! I have tried everything to get rid of those little suckers in my royal glaze! The only thing that works, for me, is using a food dehydrator. I decorate and put it in right away... no craters and a nice shiny coat! It also came in handy when the black sugar pearls I was using bled all over the baby shower elephants and I couldn't fix them. Had to bake every cookie over again and deliver the next morning. Using the dehydrator to dry the icing saved my butt, and my reputation with the customer.

DippinPops
November 25th, 2012, 06:44 PM
I usually don't have these issues with royal glaze - unless it is teeny areas or sometimes lines. But it's not a consistent issue so to be on the safe side it I slide them in the dehydrator to set the icing quickly (about 10 minutes is all you really need) and I haven't had any issues since. I would think a fan would do the same thing, but I wasn't too crazy about the heater - still had some craters in little areas, but not a one with the dehydrator. Make sure you are letting the icing settle for a while after stirring, then another gentle stir before icing. And when making the RG I mix on the lowest setting with paddle attachment no more than 10 minutes. I think we need to have an icing specialist to experiment with all of our icings to solve all our problems!

sweinst
November 25th, 2012, 07:50 PM
I've found that I have this issue more when I have thinner icing. I usually thin it down a bit more when I'm going to write with a tiny tip so that it flows better, but I find that it happens more when I thin it a bit. Maybe try thickening your icing a bit?

This is my answer too. I find the thinner the icing, the more likely it is to happen. I think rather than it being caused by trapped air, it has to do with the water evaporating from the icing as it dries and causing the icing to cave in on itself. From this forum, it sounds like using the dehydrator is one of the few ways to avoid this.