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Thread: Springerle Cookies

  1. #1

    Springerle Cookies

    I love the way the Springerle Cookies look. Does anyone here make any?

  2. #2
    Junior Member
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    I am teaching myself how to make these cookies. I am finally happy with my imprinting of the image, however, I'm still finding the baking temperatures to be tricky. The oven temperature and time baked can vary greatly depending on the size of the mold. I made a batch this Christmas and experienced cracking of my image due to an oven temperature that was too high. House on the Hill is a good source of reference. They have a video posted on the website illustrating the imprinting technique. They are beautiful cookies! BTW, I like House on the Hill's recipe which is given on the website, however, I have found that I like to dust my molds with powdered sugar (not flour).

  3. #3
    Thyjuan
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    I never heard of these cookies until this post...and in browsing through a baking book, there they were! No photo, so I have no idea what they look like, but I found a recipe for them. :-)

  4. #4
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    Greetings from Michigan! This is my first time to post a reply to this site even thought I have been a member since it's inception. I had to jump in however when I saw someone asking about Springerle Cookies. I had to chuckle because ever year around this time I make it my New Year's resolution to learn a new cookie, and last year it has Springerle. I am not of German heritage so I did tons of research and then held my breath, (have you priced the molds!!) and made my first batch. I live about an hour away from Frankenmuth, MI, German town, so I went and bought four molds. The cookies are very labor intensive, but they turned out beautiful, however after all that work, I found out that my family was not fond of anise. The traditional Springerle even have anise seeds on the bottom of the cookies. Next time I attempt them I will try a different flavor. Maybe lemon for Easter. Good luck on your baking endeavors. Happy, healthy New Year.

  5. #5
    The molds are expensive. What I thought you might like to do with the molds is press fondant with them and put the fondant on the cookies, or a cake. I am leaving the idea behind of these cookies, since they are so labor intensive. I am just in love with all the creativity of the decorated cookies. I don't even want to do photo-cookies anymore! LOL!!!

  6. #6
    Member MBalaska's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Post Card Cookies View Post
    I love the way the Springerle Cookies look. Does anyone here make any?
    These are definitely labor intensive cookies, and there are so many variations on the recipe and the method. The directions all say that you have to find the baking temperature and times for each sized cookie, yet I still had to buy a few molds and give it a try. It's Old Country traditional and the designs are very pretty. I'm on my third attempt with the whole egg recipe and wish to try the all egg white recipe next, then finally the Hartshorn (bakers ammonia) & butter added recipes. Here's my first cookies:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I love the look, they are so elegant. However taste is an issue as they seem kind of bland and old school for my taste (I don't like anise so I'm doing lemon). They seem to need icing or perhaps a bottom layer of chocolate to perk up the taste. I'm guessing that I'll like the bakers ammonia & butter added recipe the best. Anyhow, if you're going to try the simply recipe (eggs, flavoring, powdered sugar, & flour) then beating the whole eggs with the KA wire whip for 8 - 10 minutes, then adding the flavoring & sugar and beating again for 8 - 10 minutes on high gave me the best working dough. Change out the whip and put on the paddle to add the flour. Let the dough rest for 30 minutes and it only takes a little bit of added flour to make the dough non-sticky and roll-able. That's all I can report for now.

    I've decided that If I do find a tasty recipe then I'll buy a couple of molds of the same size. This way I can have a little variety in appearance and may determine the best temperature and time to bake the cookies, can write it down on my recipe card, and it should work each time without trouble.

  7. #7
    Member MBalaska's Avatar
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    I also learned from this first batch to take one of my big soft fluffy petal dust brushes and to clean off all of the flour/powdered sugar from the cookie after it's cut, before it dries hard, & before it's baked in.

  8. #8
    Member CTCookie's Avatar
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    They are pretty and so elegant looking! I think I would like the anise flavor, but lemon sounds good, too. Still, taste is the most important thing--I agree with you that if they are so labor intensive and don't come out To Die For, then one would have to weigh whether or not they are worth making. I love the molded look, though. Thanks for sharing.
    Almost any owie can quickly be cured with a well-timed cookie break.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Joan's Avatar
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    Your springerle look great. I've only made them once and since I don't care of anise, I made lemon. I used the recipe from House on the Hill's site since that's where I got the mold. They were ok, didn't love them, so they need some improvement on my part. I bought the Christmas set (I think there were 6 designs on one big mold) as well as one large circle that has roses on it. Haven't used that one yet. Thanks for all your tips. I'll make note of all of them. Maybe I'll try again at Easter.

    http://www.cookiedecorator.com/album...chmentid=20052

  10. #10
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    Hooked on molded Cookies

    My favorite recipe is Gingerbread shortbread from King Arthur Flour - delicious by the recipe, and even better when the back is dipped in chocolate. That was the start of my molded cookie adventures. Then I found the book, Baking With Cookie Molds by Anne L Watson. Her tips and tricks, along with recipes make molding quicker and more reliable. I have made many batches of her white chocolate recipe. Now she has a second book, Cookie Molds Around the Year, which is just as much fun as the first. I used her Wedding Cookie recipe for 2016 Christmas baking - easy to work with, holds the mold detail very well, and delicious. I use carved wooden molds, clay molds, chocolate molds, cookie stamps and all work well with her recipes.

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